Sanger Independent School District

Present Levels of Academic Achievement and Functional Performance (PLAAFP) Checklist - To reasonably calculate the IEP:

Baseline date:

1. Easily understood summary

2. Refer to state assessments, teacher-made tests, multiple choice tests, work samples, observations, progress reports, CBM, rubrics, parent information, observations, state assessment confidential student reports, etc. 
3.  Address strengths and areas of concern
4.  Statement of how the student’s disability impacts involvement/progress in the general education setting, as well as its impact on functioning in everyday life.
5.  Address the need for accommodations/modifications. 
6.  Provide a description of academic, functional, and transtion needs.
 

PLAAFP TEMPLATES

(Updated 7/8/2012)

 

1. Taking STAAR/Content Mastery or Inclusion Setting

(Can be a co-curricular statement for all general ed classes receiving special education support.)

 

Introductory Paragraph

 

________ is a ______ grade student diagnosed with a ______________ disability(ies). _________ is presently receiving enrolled grade-level instruction in ____________ (subjects/courses) in the general education classroom. ______’s full individual evaluation indicates that he has cognitive weaknesses in _______________ and academic weaknesses in _______________. (Specify if normative or relative weaknesses as noted in the cognitive and achievement assessment)

 

(Provide a short PLAAFP statement for each general education subject/course receiving special education support.)

 

On the spring STAAR _________ (subject/course) assessment, ________ was relatively proficient in ______________________ and __________________ (TEKS Student Expectations)   He demonstrated a weakness in ________________ . . (Student Expectation)   In the classroom setting __________ is able to ______ and _______ which are strengths for him. However,  __________ demonstrates a weakness in the classroom setting in _______________. (Weak Skill Area – More than likely consistent with STAAR weak area)   According to _________(Provide data to explain his performance in the weak area within the classroom setting. e.g. work samples, multiple choice questions, teacher-made tests, CBM, rubrics) __________ has difficulty ___________________________. In order to progress in the general curriculum, ______________ requires _______________ and _______________ (Accommodations) routinely in the classroom. He is making sufficient progress in class with the use of these accommodations.

 

(Provide a functional PLAAFP statement even if there are no functional weaknesses. This functional statement could be co-curricular but can be per subject if the functional behavior weaknesses are different per subjects/courses.)

 

According to (teacher information, informal observation, checklists, and/or classroom rubrics), ___________ has strengths in _____________ and ____________________. However, according to (teacher information, informal observation, checklists, and/or classroom rubrics), __________ has a weakness(es) in ________________________. At this time, this functional deficit is negatively impacting ____________”s  rate of progress.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2. Taking STAAR-Modified/General Ed or Special Ed Setting

 

Introductory Paragraph

 

________ is a ______ grade student diagnosed with a ______________ disability(ies). ______’s full individual evaluation indicates that he has cognitive weaknesses in _______________ and academic weaknesses in _______________. (Specify if normative or relative weaknesses as noted in the cognitive and achievement assessment)

 

 

(Must write a separate PLAAFP statement for each subject/course receiving modified content.)

 

_________ is presently receiving modified content instruction in ____________ (subjects/courses) in the (general education/special education) classroom.   On the spring 2012 administration of the STAAR – Modified,   ________was relatively proficient in _________ and ___________. (TEKS Student Expectations) He demonstrated weaknesses in _____________ and __________________.( TEKS Student Expectations) In the classroom setting, __________ is able to ______________ and ________________. (strengths) However, according to (type of data measurement such as work samples, teacher-made tests, CBM) he has difficulty in __________ and ____________. (Weaknesses) These deficits impact ________’s ability to progress in the general education curriculum at the same rate and level of rigor as his peers without disabilities.    Therefore, __________ requires direct and intensive instruction.   __________ routinely, independently, and effectively uses accommodations such as _____________, _________________, and _______________ during classroom instruction and testing to progress in the general curriculum . These accommodations and modifications will assist him in acquiring and transferring skills to other contexts.

 

 

 

(Provide a functional PLAAFP statement. This functional statement could be co-curricular but can be per subject if the functional behavior weaknesses are different per subjects/courses.)

 

 

According to (teacher information, informal observation, checklists, and/or classroom rubrics), ___________ has strengths in _____________ and ____________________. However, according to (teacher information, informal observation, checklists, and/or classroom rubrics), __________ has a weakness(es) in ___________________ and ____________________. At this time, these functional deficits are negatively impacting ____________”s  rate of progress.

 

 

 3. Taking STAAR-Alternate/General Ed or Special Ed Setting

 

Introductory Paragraph
 
____________ is a _______ grade student diagnosed with a significant cognitive disability. _________ currently accesses and participates in grade-level TEKS through pre-requisite skills in all academic areas.    He receives instruction in the special education classroom for all courses with the exception of __________ and ____________. __________ requires specialized supports such as ______________ and_______________ (assistance with communication, personal care, eating, transferring from setting to setting) throughout the school day. Within the classroom setting ________ is primarily evaluated by _____________. (methods other than paper/pencil such as observation, use of manipulatives, verbal responses, eye gaze, augmentative communication device)

 

(Separate PLAAFP statements for all courses receiving special education support.)

 

On the spring administration of the STAAR-Alt, ___________ demonstrated that he was able to _______________ and ________________ at the __________ complexity level. He demonstrated weaknesses in ___________ and ____________ of the STAAR-Alt complexity level ________. In the classroom setting in ____________ (subject/course) _________ is able to ______________ and _______________ (strengths) when routinely provided modifications such as _________________, __________________, and ___________________. However, according to  (type of data measurement such as work samples, teacher-made tests, CBM) he has difficulty with ________________ and __________________. (weaknesses) 

 

(Provide a functional PLAAFP statement. This functional statement could be co-curricular but can be per subject if the functional behavior weaknesses are different per subjects/courses.)

 

According to (teacher information, informal observation, checklists, and/or classroom rubrics), ___________ has strengths in _____________ and ____________________. However, according to (teacher information, informal observation, checklists, and/or classroom rubrics), __________ has a weakness(es) in ___________________ and ____________________. At this time, these functional deficits are negatively impacting ____________”s  rate of progress.
 
 
 
 
4. PPCD/PK Student
 
________ is eligible for the ______________ (PPCD/ PK Program). He is diagnosed with the disability of ______________. (Disability) ______’s full individual evaluation indicates that he has weaknesses in _______________. (Specify if normative or relative weaknesses as noted in the assessment). In the classroom setting, __________ shows strengths in _____________ and _______________. According to _____________ (type of data measurement such as work samples, teacher-made tests, CBM)  he demonstrates weaknesses in ____________ and _______________. For this IEP year, he is ready to ___________ and ____________. (skills to be addressed in IEP) In order to progress in the PK Guidelines and PK curriculum, __________ routinely receives __________________ and __________________. (accommodations) 

 

(Provide a functional PLAAFP statement that will provide at least one area of need for a functional goal.)
 
According to (teacher information, informal observation, checklists, and/or classroom rubrics), ___________ has strengths in _____________ and ____________________. However, according to (teacher information, informal observation, checklists, and/or classroom rubrics), __________ has a weakness(es) in ___________________ and ____________________. At this time, these functional deficits are negatively impacting ____________”s  rate of progress.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
 

 
 
Example of PLAAFP Statement and Annual Goals for student in a special education setting for Reading and Math
Reading: Reading Present Levels of Achievement and Functional Performance

 

XXXX   is a strong fluent reader when reading aloud. She enjoys reading selections with interesting topics or

fictional books. XXXX was assessed using Brigance 09/14/09 and her word recognition was on grade level, as it was last year. She read passages aloud at 156 wpm, whereas last year she read at 98 wpm. XXXX oral passage reading was on an upper 3rd grade level, which is the same as it was last year. Her silent passage comprehension was on a 4th grade, but last year it was on a 5th grade level. Her silent vocabulary  comprehension was at a 5th grade level, but last year she scored at a 6th grade level. XXXX  has difficulty with the critical skills of basic understanding and applying critical-thinking skills, which is negatively impacting her progress in the general curriculum. When reading silent independently, she has a difficult time staying on task and staying focused. She did not meet standard on the Spring 2009 TAKS Accommodated for Reading. She answered 8 out of 13 correctly in the area of basic understanding and 5 out of 13 in the area of applying critical-thinking skills.

 

Written Expression: Written Expression Present Levels of Achievement and Functional Performance

 

XXXX  enjoys creative writing and poetry and often uses writing as a coping mechanism. Her imagination and

creative word usage depicts a range of emotions. She has difficulty brainstorming ideas and creating drafts for

writing assignments as evident by teacher observations.  XXXX also misspells words frequently, even basic words,

and does not capitalize proper nouns consecutively. This semester, however, we are working on drafting, writing,

and revising and editing. She will also be checking for correct capitalization and using a dictionary for correct

spelling.

 

Math: Mathematics Present Levels of Achievement and Functional Performance

 

XXXX  has developed a love for math. Last school year, she did not like completing assignments and became

frustrated when she could not solve the problems given. She has made improvements on multiplication and

algebraic reasoning. She has been able to retain more information regarding mathematical concepts and is

continuing to work hard. XXXX  met standard for Spring 2009 TAKS Modified in the subject of Mathematics. The

area needed for improvement is geometry and spatial reasoning. She answered 3 out of 6 questions correctly in

this area. This school year, Angel will be focusing on properties of geometrical shapes (circumference, area,

volume, etc.) and the measurements of various types of angles.

 

Behavior: See BIP. XXXX  can be very personable, friendly, helpful, and relates well with adults.  XXXX experiences much difficulty with relating to peers and coping with academic frustration in the school setting.

 

 

MEASURABLE ANNUAL GOAL:

 

Throughout the school year, given a list of grammar rules, graphic organizers, and the use of a dictionary,

the student will write in complete sentences, amount will vary depending on assignment, with correct

spelling and punctuation with 80 percent accuracy in 5 trials.

.

SHORT-TERM OBJECTIVES

Throughout the 5th grading period, given a list of grammar rules the student will

revise drafts to clarify meaning, enhance style, include simple and compound

sentences, and improve transitions by adding, deleting, combining, and

rearranging sentences or larger units of text with 80 percent accuracy on each

draft.

 

 Within the next 10 weeks, given a list of grammer rules and the use of a dictionary

the student is expected to edit drafts for grammar, mechanics, and spelling with 80

percent accuracy in 5 trails.

 

 

MEASURABLE ANNUAL GOAL:

 

Throughout the school year,  given reading selections ,  the student will apply critical-thinking skills to better

understand by answering 3 of 5 comprehension questions, in 5 attempts.

 

SHORT-TERM OBJECTIVES

 During the 5th grading period given a graphic organizer the student will fill in the

main idea and supporting details for 5 reading selections with 80 percent accuracy.
 
 

MEASURABLE ANNUAL GOAL:

 

During the school year, given blank number lines and math rules, the student will compare and classify two and

three-dimensional figures using geometric vocabulary and properties with 80 percent accuracy in 10

trials

 

SHORT-TERM OBJECTIVES

 Within the next 15 weeks, given visual examples, the student will use properties to

classify triangles and quadrilaterals with 80 percent accuracy in 10 trials.

 

 Within the next 18 school weeks, given visual examples, the student will use

properties to classify three dimensional figures, including pyramids, cones, prisms,

and cylinders with 80 percent accuracy in 10 trials.

 
 
 
Other Examples of PLAAFP Statements 
 

Example of Current Academic Achievement and Functional Performance:

In his general education 8th grade math classroom, Mike is able to perform the algebra and geometry skills if he is provided with a calculatorm, mnemonic devices,  and much redirection by the teacher.  Mike is currently turning in about half of his assignments, and only about a third of those assignments are completed.  Accuracy of his turned-in work fluctuates markedly.  Because of his poor assignment completion, Mike received a mid-quarter failing warning letter.  Mike’s completion of assignments in other curricular areas is not a concern.

Another Example:

Stephanie, a third grader, when given a sixth grade-level mixed math operations probe that includes fractions, decimals, and percents, is able to correctly solve 87% of all problems presented.  This means that Stephanie is approximately 3 years ahead of her typical third grade peers in math calculation.  In areas of math other than calculation, Stephanie has mastered most of the fourth grade but very few of the fifth grade math standards.  She is not yet able to solve one-step equations with one variable and she is not yet able to use function tables to model algebraic relationships.  She has learned to make one but not two transformations in the area of geometry.  In probability, she has not yet learned how to use fractions to represent the probability of an event.
 

Another Example:

Todd, a fourth grader, currently reads 85 words per minute with 5 errors when given a first semester, second grade-level passage.  According to district norms, Todd is reading at the 5th percentile for fourth graders in the fall.

 

 

How do Present Levels and Baseline Data help create a measureable goal?

 

There is a direct relationship between the measureable annual goal, baseline data and the needs identified in the PLAAFPs.  Because the PLAAFPs are baseline data for the development of measurable annual goals, the same criteria used in establishing the PLAAFPs must also be used in setting the annual goal.

 

Identified Need from PLAAFP

Todd, a 4th grader, is reading at the 5th percentile based on district 4th grade norms.

Measurable Annual Goal

In 36 weeks, Todd will read 120 words per minute with 0 errors when given a second semester, second grade level passage.

 

Baseline Data from PLAAFP

Currently reads 85 words per minute with 5 errors when given a first semester, second grade-level passage

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Example PLAAFP with Goal and Benchmark/Objectives:

 

PLAAFP:  Jennifer uses the BIGmack switch or step by step when it is presented, but she uses these devices only with adults, and not with her peers.  She requires physical prompting to use the devices at least 90% of the time.  She does not acknowledge the presence of peer communicative partners in an observable manner.

Measurable Annual Goal:

Within 36 educational weeks, when provided physical prompting, Jennifer will acknowledge the presence of a peer communicative partner as evidenced by gestures, changes in body position, or vocalizations, and participate in a familiar structured turn-taking communicative routine in at least one school setting.

Benchmarks:

  1. In 9 instructional weeks, when joined by a peer, Jennifer will acknowledge the presence of a peer communicative partner as evidenced by gestures, changes in body position, or vocalizations.
  2. In 18 instructional weeks, when joined by a peer, Jennifer will acknowledge the presence of a peer communicative partner as evidenced by gestures, changes in body position, or vocalizations, and will participate in a structured turn-taking activity with a peer when physically prompted by an adult.
  3. In 27 instructional weeks, while participating in a familiar, structured turn-taking activity with a peer, Jennifer will recognize when it is appropriate to take her turn and respond to this opportunity as evidenced by gestures, changes in body position, vocalizations, or actions, and by activating a voice-output device at the appropriate time with physical prompts from an adult.

 

 

 

 

 

 
 

IEP Evaluation Rubric

IEP Section

The PLAAFP* describes the student’s current

level of functioning in areas of need.

Quality Indicators

4

3

2

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PLAAFP

1.

The PLAAFP includes a statement of the child’s strengths.

The PLAAFP includes a statement of the child’s strengths. Strengths are related to the goal area.

A strength is indicated and is somewhat related to the goal.

A strength is indicated but is poorly related to the goal area.

There is not any information included about the child’s strengths.

2.

The PLAAFP is specific, observable, and measurable.

The PLAAFP is specific, observable, and measurable. Current objective data are provided.

The PLAAFP is specific, observable, and measurable. No objective data are provided.

The PLAAFP is based on non-specific, qualitative information and is not quantified.

The PLAAFP is not specific or observable. The PLAAFP is incomplete.

3.

The PLAAFP includes a needs statement.

The PLAAFP includes a needs statement that is related to the goal and is student-centered.

The PLAAFP includes a needs statement that is related to goal but it is not student-centered.

A needs statement is present, but it is not related to the goal.

There is not a needs statement included in the PLAAFP.

4.

The PLAAFP describes how the student’s needs affect participation in the general curriculum and/or supports needed for success.

The PLAAFP quantitatively states :

(1)      the learner’s present level of performance,

(2)      the expectations of peers in the general curriculum, and

(3)    why and where the instruction        will take place

The PLAAFP includes two of three elements

The PLAAFP includes one element of the three elements

There is no description of how the student’s needs affect education in the general education.

5.

For preschool children, the PLAAFP describes how the disability affects the child’s participation in appropriate activities.

The PLAAFP describes how the disability affects the child’s participation in appropriate activities.

Test scores are reported only, without a description of how the learner’s participation in activities is influenced.

The child’s disability is described qualitatively but there is no linkage to impact on participation in activities.

There is no description of how the disability affects the child’s participation in appropriate activities.